REVIEW: Turkish Fire by Sevtap Yüce

Capture d’écran 2016-05-24 à 20.37.11Aside from being a blogger, I work as a food columnist in Québec City for Canada’s public broadcaster, Radio-Canada. The best part of my job is getting to meet so many talented chefs, get to know people who work in the food industry  who dedicate their lives to creating authentic products. I feel privileged to have the opportunity to promote the work of those who feed us day to day.

Another part of my job that I truly enjoy is reviewing cookbooks. I love it when one arrives in the mail, it always feels like Christmas! When a book grabs my attention, it very often because of the pictures. They alone make me want to cook and travel. As odd as it may seem, pictures in a
cookbook are what win my heart.

Turkey on my mind

I just received Sevtap Yüce’s Turkish Fire from Hardie Grant Books and distributed in Canada by Penguin Random House. Coup de foudre! Incredible pictures, mouth-watering recipes and a sudden desire to travel to Turkey has taken over me. I’m sending it out there.

I didn’t know Turkish Chef Sevtap Yüce until I received her book Turkish Fire. It didn’t take long before I started doing a little research. I found out Sevtap runs a restaurant in New South Wales on the east coast of Australia called the Beachwood Café. Born in Ankara, she left Turkey at a very young age. She learned English through cooking in pastry shops and restaurants in Sydney. Sevtap Yüce started cooking professionally at the age of 17. Turkish Fire is her third book.

IMG_7371Books like this one from Sevtap have the ability to make me travel and let my mind wander with flavours just by looking at the images. I transpose myself and imagine vividly what a dish would taste like. She transported me right into her homeland’s street- food culture, that of Istanbul and Ankara. Turkish Fire is quite a stunning culinary journey.

Turkish Fire features mouth-watering recipes divided according to the time of day: morning, noon, night and after dark. The latter is where traditional street food dishes are represented, the bait to my sudden urge to visit the country.

IMG_7367My favourite section of the book is Noon, especially for all the tasty bread recipes like Turkish peynir: Peynirli ve maydanozlu gözleme, or bread stuffed with feta and parsley. How can anyone resist cheese-filled gluten? A recipe in light of many others throughout the book: simple and fairly easy to reproduce with local ingredients. Sevtap’s soups, they will definitely become a part of my Winter cooking rituals.

I am certain that Turkish Fire will become one of my favourite cookbooks. It offers a sensual experience that come very rarely. I believe that photographer Alicia Taylor‘s images transporting me to Turkey which makes this such a necessary culinary journey. Sean Brock’s Heritage and Yotam Ottolenghi’s Jerusalem are two other examples.

Sevtap Yüce’s book Turkish Fire
hits store shelves May 31st and costs 39,95$.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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